Quick Answer: Is Whether It Be Grammatically Correct?

Is I’ve been correct grammar?

Yes, there is a difference.

I’ve been there, is in the present perfect tense.

We use the present perfect tense to say that something has happened in the past, but has a connection to something in the present.

For example if someone has already mentioned a specific place, and you reply – I’ve been there..

Can a question start with whether?

Both whether and if can be used to introduce indirect questions of the type that expect a ‘yes/no’ answer: She asked if/whether I liked jazz.

How do you use whether or?

Whether … or …He might come. I don’t know.I don’t know whether he will come or not.She might recognize me. … I don’t know whether she will recognize me or not.You may not like it. … You will have to take this medicine whether you like it or not.She may or may not come with us. … We will have to go whether she comes with us or not.

Is if a Complementizer?

The complementizer that in (1) functions to link the embedded sentence to the main clause, but can often be left out in English. Other examples of complementizers are if, whether, because, unless, and since.

Is it correct to say whether or not?

A: In the phrase “whether or not,” the “or not” is often optional. When the choice is up to you, you can generally use either “whether” or “if.” But you definitely need “or not” when you mean “regardless of whether,” as in, “I’m out of here whether you like it or not!”

How do you use whether it be in a sentence?

Whether sentence examplesWhether we want to admit it or not, we all wish everyone would like us. … He needs you right now, whether he knows it or not. … I really don’t know whether to finish him or not. … Whether or not you take my deal, I’ll help her. … I was unsure whether my husband would actually come with me.More items…

How do you use grammar correctly?

Key RulesUse Active Voice. … Link Ideas with a Conjunction. … Use a Comma to Connect Two Ideas As One. … Use a Serial Comma in a List. … Use the Semicolon to Join Two Ideas. … Use the Simple Present Tense for Habitual Actions. … Use the Present Progressive Tense for Current Action. … Add “ed” to verbs for the Past Tense.

Had been meaning?

“Had been” means something began in the past, lasted for some time, then ended. This is entirely in the past. … This verb tense is known as past perfect.

How can I use been in a sentence?

Been sentence examplesThe battle had been raging for some time. … I have been in Paris. … She was uneasy because she had never been on a plane before. … You’ve been a very good girl. … His little army had been beaten and scattered. … We’ve been away for a long time, you know, and so we’re anxious to get home again. … I have not been sick at all.More items…

Where do we use if and whether?

The formal rule is to use if when you have a conditional sentence and whether when you are showing that two alternatives are possible. Some examples will make this more clear. Here’s an example where the two words could be interchangeable: Squiggly didn’t know whether Aardvark would arrive on Friday.

What is another word for whether?

In this page you can discover 6 synonyms, antonyms, idiomatic expressions, and related words for whether, like: either, if, even-if, in-case, if it follows that and doubt.

What is the difference between weather and whether?

Weather is primarily used as a noun. It is the state of the atmosphere in a particular place e.g., rain, sunshine, snow and so on. Whether is a conjunction. It is mostly used to introduce a clause and express a doubt or choice between alternatives.

What is the antonym of whether?

What is the opposite of whether?all the samein any caseregardlesswithout a doubtwithout consideringwithout regard toalthoughthoughalbeithowever4 more rows

What kind of word is whether?

Unlike the word weather, the term whether is not a noun or verb, but rather is a conjunction. A conjunction is a word that joins two words or phrases together. The term whether is similar in meaning to the word if.

Where we use have had?

In the present perfect, the auxiliary verb is always have (for I, you, we, they) or has (for he, she, it). In the past perfect, the auxiliary verb is always had. We use have had in the present perfect when the main verb is also “have”: I’m not feeling well.

Has been or had been?

“Has been” and “have been” are both in the present perfect tense. “Has been” is used in the third-person singular and “have been” is used for first- and second-person singular and all plural uses. … “Had been” is the past perfect tense and is used in all cases, singular and plural.

How do you use weather and whether in a sentence?

He wants to go outside, whether the weather is wet or dry. Johnny decides he will go outside and weather whatever weather comes today. He will play whether his friends join him or not!